Art Vocabulary

******WORK IN PROGRESS******

 

Periodically I’ll  keep this page updated on art vocabulary. Many words are words everyone is familiar with, but they sometimes have a different meaning in the art room. For example: texture is the way something feels. But in art, there are two types of texture: visual (or “seeing”) and actual (or “feeling) texture. Please see the list below to see what our budding artists are learning!

Kindergarten

  •  Elements of Art/Elements of Design: Components comprising a work of art, such as line, color, texture, value, shape, space, and form.
  • Line: An element of art, which refers to, the continuous mark made on a surface by a moving point, i.e., 2-dimensional pencil marks on paper or 3-dimensional wire lines. (Line is often an outline, contour, or silhouette.)
  • Color: An element of art with properties of hue (the color name, i.e., red, blue, etc.), intensity (the purity and strength of the color, i.e., bright red, dull red, etc.), and value (the lightness or darkness of a color).
  • Value: An element of art that describes the lightness or darkness of a color; the gradual changes in drawings, woodcuts, photographs, etc. even when color is absent.
  • Texture: An element of art referring to surface qualities; the look or feel of objects.
  • Shape: The element of art that has two dimensions: length and width.
  • Form: An element of art that is three-dimensional (having height, width, and depth) and which encloses volume, i.e., cubes, spheres, pyramids, and cylinders; the configuration or shape of an object in two-dimensional or three-dimensional space; and art marked by a distinctive style, form, or content.
  • Space: An art element that can be described as two- or three-dimensional in reference to the distance or area between, around, above, below, or within objects. (Volume refers to the space within a form.)
  • Primary Colors: red, yellow, blue
  • Secondary Colors: The colors you get when you mix 2 primary colors together: red + yellow = orange, red + blue = violet, and yellow + blue = green.
  • Portrait: In art, the subject is a person.
  • Self Portrait: In art, the subject is the artist.

First Grade

  • Elements of Art/Elements of Design: Components comprising a work of art, such as line, color, texture, value, shape, space, and form.
  • Line: An element of art, which refers to, the continuous mark made on a surface by a moving point, i.e., 2-dimensional pencil marks on paper or 3-dimensional wire lines. (Line is often an outline, contour, or silhouette.)
  • Color: An element of art with properties of hue (the color name, i.e., red, blue, etc.), intensity (the purity and strength of the color, i.e., bright red, dull red, etc.), and value (the lightness or darkness of a color).
  • Value: An element of art that describes the lightness or darkness of a color; the gradual changes in drawings, woodcuts, photographs, etc. even when color is absent.
  • Texture: An element of art referring to surface qualities; the look or feel of objects. There are two types of textures in art. Texture you can actually feel and texture that just looks like it has a feeling, but still feels like whatever the artwork was created on. – Mrs. McCormick
  • Shape: The element of art that has two dimensions: length and width. There are two types of shapes: geometric and organic. Geometric shapes all have shape names (ex: square, circle, heart, diamond, oval, etc.) and organic shapes are shapes that do not have a shape name (ex: shapes that look like eyes, shapes that look like paint splatter, etc.) – Mrs. McCormick
  • Form: An element of art that is three-dimensional (having height, width, and depth) and which encloses volume, i.e., cubes, spheres, pyramids, and cylinders; the configuration or shape of an object in two-dimensional or three-dimensional space; and art marked by a distinctive style, form, or content.
  • Space: An art element that can be described as two- or three-dimensional in reference to the distance or area between, around, above, below, or within objects. (Volume refers to the space within a form.)

Second Grade

  • Elements of Art/Elements of Design: Components comprising a work of art, such as line, color, texture, value, shape, space, and form.
  • Line: An element of art, which refers to, the continuous mark made on a surface by a moving point, i.e., 2-dimensional pencil marks on paper or 3-dimensional wire lines. (Line is often an outline, contour, or silhouette.)
  • Color: An element of art with properties of hue (the color name, i.e., red, blue, etc.), intensity (the purity and strength of the color, i.e., bright red, dull red, etc.), and value (the lightness or darkness of a color).
  • Value: An element of art that describes the lightness or darkness of a color; the gradual changes in drawings, woodcuts, photographs, etc. even when color is absent.
  • Texture: An element of art referring to surface qualities; the look or feel of objects.
  • Shape: The element of art that has two dimensions: length and width.
  • Form: An element of art that is three-dimensional (having height, width, and depth) and which encloses volume, i.e., cubes, spheres, pyramids, and cylinders; the configuration or shape of an object in two-dimensional or three-dimensional space; and art marked by a distinctive style, form, or content.
  • Space: An art element that can be described as two- or three-dimensional in reference to the distance or area between, around, above, below, or within objects. (Volume refers to the space within a form.)

Third Grade

  • Elements of Art/Elements of Design: Components comprising a work of art, such as line, color, texture, value, shape, space, and form.
  • Line: An element of art, which refers to, the continuous mark made on a surface by a moving point, i.e., 2-dimensional pencil marks on paper or 3-dimensional wire lines. (Line is often an outline, contour, or silhouette.)
  • Color: An element of art with properties of hue (the color name, i.e., red, blue, etc.), intensity (the purity and strength of the color, i.e., bright red, dull red, etc.), and value (the lightness or darkness of a color).
  • Value: An element of art that describes the lightness or darkness of a color; the gradual changes in drawings, woodcuts, photographs, etc. even when color is absent.
  • Texture: An element of art referring to surface qualities; the look or feel of objects.
  • Shape: The element of art that has two dimensions: length and width.
  • Form: An element of art that is three-dimensional (having height, width, and depth) and which encloses volume, i.e., cubes, spheres, pyramids, and cylinders; the configuration or shape of an object in two-dimensional or three-dimensional space; and art marked by a distinctive style, form, or content.
  • Space: An art element that can be described as two- or three-dimensional in reference to the distance or area between, around, above, below, or within objects. (Volume refers to the space within a form.)

Fourth Grade

  • Elements of Art/Elements of Design: Components comprising a work of art, such as line, color, texture, value, shape, space, and form.
  • Line: An element of art, which refers to, the continuous mark made on a surface by a moving point, i.e., 2-dimensional pencil marks on paper or 3-dimensional wire lines. (Line is often an outline, contour, or silhouette.)
  • Color: An element of art with properties of hue (the color name, i.e., red, blue, etc.), intensity (the purity and strength of the color, i.e., bright red, dull red, etc.), and value (the lightness or darkness of a color).
  • Value: An element of art that describes the lightness or darkness of a color; the gradual changes in drawings, woodcuts, photographs, etc. even when color is absent.
  • Texture: An element of art referring to surface qualities; the look or feel of objects.
  • Shape: The element of art that has two dimensions: length and width.
  • Form: An element of art that is three-dimensional (having height, width, and depth) and which encloses volume, i.e., cubes, spheres, pyramids, and cylinders; the configuration or shape of an object in two-dimensional or three-dimensional space; and art marked by a distinctive style, form, or content.
  • Space: An art element that can be described as two- or three-dimensional in reference to the distance or area between, around, above, below, or within objects. (Volume refers to the space within a form.)

Fifth Grade

  • Elements of Art/Elements of Design: Components comprising a work of art, such as line, color, texture, value, shape, space, and form.
  • Line: An element of art, which refers to, the continuous mark made on a surface by a moving point, i.e., 2-dimensional pencil marks on paper or 3-dimensional wire lines. (Line is often an outline, contour, or silhouette.)
  • Color: An element of art with properties of hue (the color name, i.e., red, blue, etc.), intensity (the purity and strength of the color, i.e., bright red, dull red, etc.), and value (the lightness or darkness of a color).
  • Value: An element of art that describes the lightness or darkness of a color; the gradual changes in drawings, woodcuts, photographs, etc. even when color is absent.
  • Texture: An element of art referring to surface qualities; the look or feel of objects.
  • Shape: The element of art that has two dimensions: length and width.
  • Form: An element of art that is three-dimensional (having height, width, and depth) and which encloses volume, i.e., cubes, spheres, pyramids, and cylinders; the configuration or shape of an object in two-dimensional or three-dimensional space; and art marked by a distinctive style, form, or content.
  • Space: An art element that can be described as two- or three-dimensional in reference to the distance or area between, around, above, below, or within objects. (Volume refers to the space within a form.)

 

*Most art terms were defined by the Maryland Dept of Education. An alphabetical list can be found here. Art terms not taken from Maryland Dept of Ed were defined by Mrs. McCormick

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